WORSHIP WITH US

We welcome you to worship and learn with us at Bet Shalom Messianic Congregation.

We gather together weekly for Hebraic worship, Biblical teaching from the Hebrew perspective, Messianic Dance and caring fellowship.

We look forward to seeing you!
Rabbi Amnon & Rebbetzin Lynette Shor

SATURDAY SHABBAT SERVICES

Messianic Lifestyle Class - 2 PM
In the Oneg Hall
Shabbat Service - 4 PM
In the Sanctuary
Oneg after Shabbat Service
In the Oneg Hall

WE MEET AT

MT OLIVE CHURCH
101 W Clinton Avenue
Fresno CA 93705

between Palm and Fruit Avenues
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CONTACT US

MAIL:
Bet Shalom Messianic Congregation
5132 N Palm Avenue PMB 101
Fresno, CA 93704

PHONE:
559-288-0330
EMAIL:
betshalom@betshalomfresno.org

MOTZEH SHABBAT – HAVDALAH

The Shabbat officially ends when three stars become visible in the evening sky. Havdalah means “separation,” and officially begins the new week. Just as the holiness of Shabbat is ushered into the home with a ceremony, so it should have an official closing, as a distinction between what is holy and what is worldly. The blessings and Scriptures read at this time extend this idea of separation of light from dark, followers of God from the heathen, and God’s high moral standards from man’s corruption.

Havdalah uses the elements of the fruit of the vine and candles, but in a different form than Shabbat. When the fruit of the vine is poured, it is allowed to overflow the cup, a symbol of God’s overflowing blessing to us. It also shows the fullness and completion of our week, and the hope that the week to come would also overflow with blessings. The fruit of the vine was often costly in ancient Israel, so a house where it flowed like water was regarded as truly blessed. As believers, this is a reminder of Messiah’s blood poured out for us.

After the blessing for the fruit of the vine, a box of fragrant spices, or “bessamim” is blessed and passed around. Today, bessamim is a reminder of the incense burned when the high priest ministered in Temple times, and of the One High Priest ministering for us in heaven today. When incense was burned in the holy of holies, it was a symbol of our prayers being a fragrant aroma as they ascended to God.

The candle used for Havdalah is braided with multiple wicks. This “torch” provides more light than an ordinary candle. As believers, we light the candle to remember the light of Messiah that blots out the darkness of sin.

As the Shabbat was opened at dusk with greetings of “Shabbat shalom!” now we close with “Shavuah tov!” — “May the week ahead be good!”

April 2011